Are Web Fonts Ready for Prime Time? ›

Excellent article from Pat about the appropriateness of using @font-face to load new fonts on websites.

Being a Mac user it’s easy to forget not everyone has the same clean rendering of fonts as I do, and Pat brings a great reminder that I can’t just go with what I see. Essentially he raises a great point. Just because we can use any font we’d like, doesn’t mean we should.

Anyone can get fans by simply showing up day after day and being genuine. But to get fanatics you have to do something long enough to create nostalgia. Or you have to do something crazy or wonderful enough to give your current fans something to get fanatical about.

Shawn Blanc

Fanatics by Shawn Blanc

A Not Quite Full Review, of a Not Quite Great Twitter App: Twitterrific ›

Ben Brooks’ review of Twitterrific 4 finishes with this little comment.

It doesn’t feel finished — it feels like a version 1.0 product. If this was a version 1.0 then I would be excited for its future, but given the version 4 nature I am hardly impressed.

A fair assessment, but essentially this is a version 1. It’s so different to the previous versions and I believe that the Iconfactory actually started again like they did on iOS with the new version. Still, some of the decisions they’ve made are odd.

As a side note:

You can’t close image windows (Twitpic and the like) with the keyboard.

Try pressing escape and you’ll find this comment incorrect. I was being driven mad until I stumbled across this though, so I can see where Ben is coming from.

Can Leo Apotheker make Hewlett Packard a cool company? ›

Interesting interview with Hewlett Packards CEO Leo Apotheker which includes this little nugget.

HP will stop making announcements for stuff it doesn’t have. When HP makes announcements, it will be getting ready to ship,” he promises, saying the products launched on 9 February will be on sale just a few weeks later.

So how come everything launched today isn’t available til the summer?

Send your Instapaper reading log to Readability ›

The web has been a buzz with Readbility talk this last week. I’ve been waiting to hear how it’s going to work with Instapaper, which has just been answered by Marco in this post.

The question I’m still left with is. What if I find an article I want to read because someone I respect has linked to it, but which I really don’t agree with? I only support things I believe in and not everything I save to Instapaper falls into that category.

My First Conference (Part Two)

I’ve been trying to work a seemingly random collection of thoughts into a follow up post about New Adventures conference. It’s not really happened so I’ve chosen to just throw them out there to anyone who is interested.

Overall I enjoyed the day, it was fun, informative and pushed me out of my comfort zone, teaching me things about design and myself that are valuable and I am processing in order to improve.

Most enjoyable was Brendan’s talk. He was the most entertaining in delivery and engaged the audience excellently. His passion for design is infectious, but something I felt myself identifying with straight away. I don’t obsess over using the right pencil, but my friends can attest that I do obsess over other seemingly pointless items.

Most disappointing was Veerle Pieter’s talk about inspiration. I really enjoy Veerle’s blog, and so was looking forward to hearing her talk but, for me, it had too much example and not enough insight. I was hoping for some processes which people could adopt or adapt to make their own and use as triggers in the creative process. I know we all work differently, but hearing how someone goes about finding inspiration when all they are hitting is brick wall after brick wall can be inspiring in itself. Veerle also seemed to contradict some of the talks from the morning, with a theme of doing something a certain way because you like it rather than for a particular reason. Whilst design is subjective and sometimes we go with our gut, there’s usually reason for doing it beyond “I like it”.

Most thought provoking was Dan Rubin’s talk on maturing the industry by developing a language that has meaning and that everyone can understand. Having moved to a new job around 3 months ago and having had the opportunity to work on a couple of web jobs, this struck a cord. The things I mean when I refer to something and the things they mean when my new colleagues refer to something are easily confused on these jobs, however, when it comes to a print job everyone knows exactly what the other person means.

Elliot’s talk, Andy Clarke’s, Jon Tan’s and Mark Boulton’s were also some of the most informative, interesting and thought provoking talks that left me feeling inspired and motivated. Good stuff that I have already noticed is informing the way I work.

New Adventures was a really good day, which I thoroughly enjoyed, hopefully I’ll get to a few more in the future and I’m certainly hoping that I can make it to New Adventures 2.